Karine Jean-Pierre in the White House, quite an icon

Everyone remembers January 20, 2009, a date that became historic with the inauguration of Barak Obama, the first African American President of the United States. The equally important January 2021 deadline follows with the appointment of an African-American vice president, Kamala Harris, for the first time. Never two without three, they say, and this was confirmed on May 5 when President Joe Biden appointed Karine Jean-Pierre to the crucial post of White House spokeswoman. As the first African American woman to hold the position, she succeeds Democrat Jen Psaki, whose deputy she was. “I’m everything Donald Trump hates: woman, black, gay and mom,” she declared in 2018. A Trump she fought for a long time…

In the 2019 book Moving Forward, Karine Jean-Pierre shares her experiences and her American Dream.

Karine Jean-Pierre was born in Fort-de-France, Martinique, to Haitian parents who fled the Duvalier dictatorship. She spent her first four years in Paris before the family emigrated to New York and settled near Queens. At the time, his father was a taxi driver and his mother was a domestic help. Perfectly French-speaking, this forty-something with short curls and a very dynamic appearance is no stranger to the political world. She was actively involved in both President Obama’s campaigns, having served as a lecturer at Columbia University, which she attended, and having been fully involved in civil rights campaigns. A path that led her directly into politics.

Karine Jean-Pierre shortly after being named White House Speaker, May 5, 2022. Photo Reuters / Kevin Lamarque /

A political and social rise

On Friday, May 13, she will take her place behind the iconic desk in the White House Briefing Room, where she will answer questions from the American and international media. She dedicated her success, which inspired many Americans, to the younger generation through a message that AFP reported: “If you work very hard for a goal, it will happen. Yes, you will also take hard hits, you will go through difficult times and it will not always be easy, but the reward will be incredible, especially if you stay true to yourself. After receiving warm applause at her nomination, the “hard hits” she spoke of soon fell, from critics who immediately brought to light her past as an anti-Israel activist and her role as senior adviser and national spokesperson for left-wing NGO MoveOn . org, a political association founded in 1998 by two IT entrepreneurs that advocates a boycott of the Jewish state. According to the Washington Free Beacon, “The election of a person critical of Israel is likely to further strain ties with the pro-Israel community and the Israeli government, which already strongly opposes the government’s efforts to sign Biden on a nuclear deal with Iran.” Karine Jean -Pierre also battles mental health-related issues. She confessed to having been a victim of sexual violence herself as a child, a traumatic episode that led her to severe depression and attempted suicide, from which she emerged strengthened.

Karine Jean-Pierre as a child, surrounded by her parents. The photo is from his Instagram account @k_jeanpierre

The American dream

And as expected, Suzanne Malveaux, the woman who shares Karine Jean-Pierre’s life, also suffered collateral damage. A great reporter for CNN, she covered the White House for a long time. “Suzanne Malveaux will continue in her role as CNN’s national correspondent, covering national and international news and cultural events, but she will not cover politics, the Capitol and the White House while Karine Jean-Pierre is the White House press secretary. ‘ said a spokesman for the station. The two women have been in a relationship for almost twenty years. They have their francophone and creole culture in common. The first is of Haitian origin and lived in Martinique, while the second is from Creole Louisiana. They also share an adopted daughter, whom they gave the pretty name Sun. We can also learn more about Karine Jean-Pierre through a book she published in 2019 called Moving forward: a story of hope, hard work, and the Promise of America. A title that perfectly illustrates her success story and the realization of this American dream, which, as she affirms, “still exists”. Based on her own story she tells, looking back on her life as a first generation Haitian American. “She shares what she’s learned about politics and offers it as a playbook for anyone who wants to participate, no matter how or where they grew up, young or old,” the foreword reads. Author Stacey Abraham adds, “Forward comes at a time when inspiration, insight and optimism are scarce. Karine Jean-Pierre supplies all three. »

Everyone remembers January 20, 2009, a date that became historic with the inauguration of Barak Obama, the first African American President of the United States. The equally important January 2021 deadline follows with the appointment of an African-American vice president, Kamala Harris, for the first time. Never two without three they say and it was confirmed on May 5th when the…

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